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Posted by Josh de Keijzer on

A God in the Hands of Angry Sinners: How the Evangelical Misconstrual of God and Politics Spells Doom

A God in the Hands of Angry Sinners: How the Evangelical Misconstrual of God and Politics Spells Doom

Many people in the United States are familiar with the famous sermon Jonathan Edwards, the Puritan preacher and scholar in the Massachusetts of the 1700s, preached on the 8th of July 1741. The title of his sermon was “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God.” As was his custom, Edwards read his sermon out loud. An utterly boring routine for a spiritually inert congregation. But something weird happened. People started shaking and trembling. Some fell to the ground sobbing and moaning. Edwards’ sermon is a good example of the theology of the Great Awakening, a movement of religious fervor and repentance that swept through the thirteen colonies of America and left a permanent mark on the Protestant faith in the North American continent.

Posted by Josh de Keijzer on

My Struggle With Evangelicalism: From Inerrant Word to Subjugated World

My Struggle With Evangelicalism: From Inerrant Word to Subjugated World

In my previous post, I discussed my experience in evangelicalism and focused on four things that were instrumental in pushing me out. These four were: the hunger for power, the lack of freedom to ask questions, the inability to deal with suffering an lament, and the know-it-all attitude that places evangelical thought on a pedestal. These four things describe the environment as it was and why I started to feel more and more uneasy. They eventually became objections too.