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Posted by Josh de Keijzer on

Theodicy: Seeing the Theo in It

Theodicy: Seeing the Theo in It

The Scream, Edvard Munch

Theodicy, a complicated word for an even more complicated question: how can a good and omnipotent God allow the existence of evil in the world? As long as people have believed in God, believers, theologians, and philosophers have tried to explain how this is possible, How, in spite of all the unimaginable suffering that this world produces, there is actually a God and a good one at that. Most of those explanations seek to justify God: God (theo) is just (dikay), hence theodicy.

Posted by Josh de Keijzer on

Bonhoeffer’s Theology of the Cross

Bonhoeffer’s Theology of the Cross

BonhoefferBonhoeffer’s theology is a modern version of Luther’s theology of the cross. It is not merely a slavishly reworked version but constitutes a highly original contribution to the conversation that captures both the essential elements and the heart of Luther’s theology and makes it relevant for today. To the extent that Luther’s work represented a copernican revolution in theology Bonhoeffer’s work does too.

Posted by Josh de Keijzer on

Encountering Jesus in the Gospel of Mark

The strange Jesus of Mark
After not having read the Gospels for a few years and after abandoning the standard paradigm of already knowing who Jesus is and what the text means and thus coming to the text with assumptions, a prioris, and prior commitments, resulting in a Jesus who more conforms to our conventions and our fossilized religious framework, reading Mark anew provides for a fresh encounter.

Posted by Josh de Keijzer on

Spellbound by the Gospel: What the Gospel Is and What It Isn’t

My recent blogpost over at Whiteboard//Blip (Part I and Part II).

Part I, What the Gospel is

billy-graham-preachingRecently one of my best friends, who is involved in Christian ministry at a major university in the United States, was criticized by his employers for not generating enough ‘decisions for Christ.’ Too bad, for, even though my friend is not after decisions, his may be one of the few Christian campus ministries that attracts decent amounts of ‘unbelievers.’ At a recent gathering 80 people turned out, most of them not affiliated with Christianity.

Posted by Josh de Keijzer on

Het hart van de zaak: waarom apologetiek faalt te overtuigen

The Heart of the Matter: Why Apologetics Fails to Convince

This is the pre-editorial version of my recent (Dutch language) article for newspaper Reformatorisch Dagblad, a conservative newspaper in the Netherlands, on why apologetics fails to convince its audience. I use James K. A. Smith’s book “Desiring the Kingdom” to show that apologetics doesn’t reach the human heart, the real locus of dedication and source of transformation.

Posted by Josh de Keijzer on

The Cost of Discipleship

The following is my blogpost for the Bethel Seminary admissions Blog on June 25th 2014

wwjd_by_F1lip3k“The Cost of Discipleship” is the wrongly translated title of Bonhoeffer’s “Nachfolge.” It should simply be “Discipleship,” although the translator was quite right in pointing out the cost involved in discipleship as Bonhoeffer saw it. What is, so I want to ponder in this piece, the cost of discipleship for us evangelicals today? As we will see it is one thing to have the mind of Christ but quite another to know what that mind is. This may seem a contradiction, but by the end of this article I hope it will be a self-evident paradox.

Posted by Josh de Keijzer on

Postmodern Apologetics?

This post is a translation of my article for “Reformatorisch Dagblad,” a conservative Dutch newspaper, on the way in which contemporary phenomenology provides a new apologetic argument of sorts for the truth of Christianity. This English translation is provided in response to a request. While this article engages the recently published Postmodern Apologetics? Arguments for God in Contemporary Philosophy it is not intended as a book review. Rather this article attempts to introduce to a non-academic, conservative but interested audience, in a non-technical way, the value of continental philosophy.